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Man pleads guilty in theft of Palmer jacket, more Masters items - ESPN

CHICAGO — A former warehouse assistant for the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia pleaded guilty Wednesday to transporting millions of dollars worth of stolen Masters memorabilia and historic items, including one of Arnold Palmer's green jackets.

Richard Globensky, of Georgia, made his initial court appearance in federal court in Chicago, where he entered the plea.

Federal prosecutors said the 39-year-old would take items from the warehouse and transport them to another party in Florida for sale online. The scheme went on for nearly a decade, and Globensky made roughly $5 million from the sales.

He was charged with one count of transporting goods knowing they had been stolen.

«I plead guilty,» Globensky, who was wearing a suit and tie, told the judge.

The items, stolen between 2009 and 2022, included T-shirts, mugs and chairs, and historic memorabilia, including green jackets and tickets to Masters tournaments from the 1930s.

Globensky declined to comment to reporters. His attorney, Thomas Church, said the case was being tried in Chicago because some of the stolen goods were recovered in the area.

Sentencing will be in late October. He faces a maximum of 10 years in prison but will likely get closer to two years under the sentencing guidelines.

Read more on espn.com